What are you doing to build your “Proprietary Audience?

December 17, 2014

I had the chance to hear Jeffrey Rohrs speak at a WTWH Media event recently and subsequently read his new book, Audience.

Jeff’s take on social media and content marketing revolves around one thing – THE AUDIENCE.

Companies need audiences to survive – before they are customers they first have to be part of an audience. As we all are focusing on creating content, it won’t mean much if you don’t have someone to read and react to it.

And that’s his point, to build what he calls the “Proprietary Audience.” He defines it as ” a comprehensive, collaborative and cross-channel effort to build audiences that your company alone can access.”

He shows you how to build your database using paid, owned and earned media to identify your audience. He also shows you how to identify and communicate with Seekers (those that are looking for info), Amplifiers (those who have audiences that can share your info) and Joiners (those that are buyers).

The book is an easy read and I would recommend your marketing teams look at Audience as a new marketing discipline.


From MAGNET: How to Use LinkedIn to Promote Your Innovative Company

December 11, 2014

Each month we be feature a blog post from our friends at MAGNET (Manufacturing Advocacy & Growth Network). MAGNET’s mission is to support, educate and champion manufacturing in Ohio with the goal of transforming the region’s economy into a powerful, global player. You can visit MAGNET online at manufacturingsuccess.org.

How to Use LinkedIn to Promote Your Innovative Company

If you haven’t adopted LinkedIn as a means for promoting your company, now is definitely the time to do it. As of this week, LinkedIn has modified the format of company pages and this may prove to be especially beneficial for manufacturing companies. The change LinkedIn unveiled is the removal of the “Products & Services” tab of your company page in order to make way for showcase pages.

Showcase pages allow you to extend your company page presence by creating a dedicated page for your most innovative products and services. On these pages, you can share content just as you would with company page status updates. The new format helps your company build long-term relationships with LinkedIn members who want to follow specific areas of your business that interest them most. In addition, it can help you attract the hard-to-reach younger workforce by presenting your company as an innovative and lively company. As many manufacturing companies have a complex and vast array of products and services, each with different audiences, showcase pages allow you to address different markets with customized content. Whether on purpose or not, LinkedIn’s showcase pages provide the ability to segment your audience and these people can choose to subscribe to any of your pages in order to receive content that’s tailored to what they’re interested in. 

Keys to Showcase Page Success 

Showcase pages have a lot of potential and provide an opportunity to highlight what makes your company stand out. The key to getting the most out of this feature is to regularly post relevant and interesting information to each showcase page. There are many different types of content or information you can post, and here are just a few options:

  • Updates or revisions to products or services
  • Little known facts about each area of your business
  • Answers to some of the most common questions asked
  • Awards or recognition
  • Interesting applications of products
  • Industry news from authoritative sources
  • Trade show appearances, including where you’ll be and what you’ll be presenting

Part of being an innovative, leading-edge company is embracing change. And the most recent change to LinkedIn offers you an opportunity to deliver relevant content to prospective customers, partners or employees about the areas of your business that interest them most. Take advantage of this marketing tool to develop deeper relationships with your audience and “showcase” what makes your company innovative.

Click Here to read the original post.


What part of selling is the “Human Factor?”

December 9, 2014

I know everyone is so focused on social media and content creation, but that’s only the beginning of the sales cycle. When people identify themselves, who makes the sale – the internet or a person? I’d say unless you’re selling a commodity or selling on price, there needs to be interaction with a person(s) along the way. In other words, the Human Factor takes over.

I’ve been in the sales game for over 40 years and I’m here to tell you times have changed and if you don’t adapt, you’re going to be working harder, not smarter. More importantly, we all need to try to improve ourselves and those around us.

ToSellIsHuman

I just finished a great book by Daniel H. Pink titled To Sell is Human. It goes into who is selling now, how they should approach it and great tips on being more effective.

Here are some highlights that I got out of it:

  • The A,B,C’s of selling no longer apply - You can’t be always closing because folks will turn you off. You need honesty, fairness and transparency. No longer is it a buyer’s beware, instead it’s a seller’s beware landscape.
  • 25% of our waking hours are spent listening – That’s why God gave us two ears and one mouth. We need to learn how to ask better questions and then listen.
  • We spend 41% of our time trying to persuade someone to do something we want - that pretty much makes us all salesmen of one sort or another.
  • Non-selling is the key to success - instead of trying to upsell someone, try upserving them and see what happens. It will transform the mundane into something memorable, and guess who they are going to buy from?

The key to selling is being able to move others to your way of thinking and times have changed. The book is a good read. Enjoy.


Jerks are going to be jerks: Do’s and Don’ts for dealing with jerks online

December 4, 2014

Rachel Kerstetter, PR Engineer, Sonnhalter

Sometimes in life you encounter people who are jerks.

Via Mike Licht

Via Mike Licht

As children, we were often told to ignore the jerks. As adults we find ways to cope with the jerks we encounter throughout our days.

It’s a little more difficult for companies to deal with the jerks on social media. Unfortunately social media also provides jerks with a megaphone for their poor attitudes.

You can’t make everyone like you on social media, but you can take the high road when it comes to the social jerks who you encounter.

Don’t fire back at them.

If someone tweets nasty things at your company, don’t tweet nasty things back at them. It makes you look petty and like a jerk yourself.

Do fix legitimate problems.

People often use social media for customer service problems. If someone is having a problem that has them upset, they might come off as a jerk on social media. Publically respond that you would like to do what you can to fix their problem and ask for contact. For example, “We’re sorry to hear you’re having a delivery problem, please direct message us your email or phone number so we can find out more about your problem.” Or “We have been experiencing some issues with x, please call customer service at 800-xxx-xxx for an update.”

Don’t let jerks scare you away from using social media.

Often when we consult with a company who either refuses to join social media or has their channels locked down, it’s because they’re concerned about negativity on their social media channels. People will say what they want, if you let them say it on your channel you can be aware of it, try to fix it, or let your community come to your defense.

Do let the rest of your community support you.

Social media jerks (they are usually called “detractors”) tend to show themselves for who they are. Social community members are great at identifying the jerks out there and will sometimes shut them down for you by responding with their own positive tales. Definitely foster a positive social media community, it can work for your organization.

Don’t be a jerk yourself.

Whether this is on your personal or your company’s social media, do what you can to not be a jerk. If you have a problem with a product or service and choose to try to solve it on social media, do so in a human and respectful manner. It sets a great example for all around you.

Do report abusive users.

It is absolutely okay to report a social media account that is spamming or harassing your company. On a promoted tweet program for a client, one user took their hate for promoted tweets so far as to abuse our client’s account and claimed to report us for spam. (All social media ad programs that we run are in compliance with the platform’s policies and are in no way spam.) So we reported the user back for harassment. Make sure you read the terms before reporting a user so that you aren’t being a jerk. (By the way, if you don’t want to see a promoted tweet or post, click the dismiss button and Twitter won’t show it to you again.)


Are You Still Pitching or Are You Starting a Conversation?

December 2, 2014

I’m still amazed by the number of folks who are still trying to sell me something instead of trying to solve my problem. I think it’s because they are struggling with their story and finding the right voice to tell it on. The old school model of glad handling and feature benefit selling has gone by the wayside for the most part.

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Let’s face it none of us wants to be sold. We want to have a conversation. Humans, by nature, are social by design and want to interact with others. Interaction is a two-way street where both parties are part of the conversation. It’s not grabbing attention, but earning and holding attention.

How do we do this? By acting and speaking HUMAN. Storytelling is an essential human activity and must be a vital part of your strategy.

I recently read an article in Chief Content Officer magazine by Kevin Lund and Eileen Sutton that talks about speaking human and gives us some tips on how to be successful at it.

Here are some highlights:

  • Be Clear - No marketing speak. Use plain English with no jargon and more heart.
  • Be Helpful - Be relevant to a specific issue. Show them how you add value.
  • Be Concise - Keep it to the point. Less is better.
  • Be Consistent - Use the same voice and tone throughout all channels.

If you can figure out how to make life easier for your customer, everyone wins.


What’s stopping you from developing a content marketing strategy?

November 4, 2014

If you’re going to create good content, shouldn’t you have some basic parameters in place before doing it? If not, you’ll be writing about everything to no specific audience and the results will be less than desirable.

So what’s holding you back from writing down your content strategy? My guess is you’re not sure where to start. You know that the document doesn’t have to be complicated. It needs to cover some basic points for you and your team to focus on when creating content. It’s also good to share with the rest of the team so everyone is on the same page.

create-a-content-marketing-strategy-your-customers-will-love-in-7-steps-18-638

Slide Credit: Convince and Convert

A recent post by Jay Baer outlines very simply what you need to do to create a strategy in 7 steps. Here are some highlights:

  • Objective - What are you trying to accomplish? Deliver leads, create awareness?
  • What makes you different - You need something that’s going to set you apart. What is it?
  • Metrics - How are you going to determine the success or failure of your efforts if you don’t define a way to measure it?
  • Define your audience - Who do you want to talk to and why?
  • Audience needs - Do some research to find out what their needs are.
  • Content execution - What are you going to write about and when? Where do they get their info as you want to deliver it there instead of them having to go look for it.
  • Content promotion - Once it’s written, use social media to create a bigger buzz.

Are You Using Automation Tools to Help in Social Media?

October 22, 2014

We’re all trying to do more with less. When it comes to social media, it’s no different. We should be focused on content and use automated tools to help spread the word on social platforms. Every industry is different, but following are some automation tools you should consider and an infographic on the best times to post.

Here’s a list of tools that I’ve used that will help you schedule and post your content at the best time: 

  • SocialOomph – I use this tool to help repurpose my content. Scheduling to publish content is very easy across your social media accounts.
  • HootSuitePro – Allows you to manage up to 50 social media profiles, schedule your content and report your analytics.
  • Buffer – Helps you manage multiple social media accounts at once and easily schedule content.
  • ManageFlitter – Tools that will help to optimize your Twitter account and identify your Twitter accounts’ prime time.
  • Tweriod – Analyzes both yours and your follower’s tweets to give you the best time to tweet.
  • TweetWhen – A Hubspot tool that shows what days and times get the most retweets per tweet.
  •  Insights – Provides information about your Facebook audience.

The following infographic by SurePayroll, will give you a ballpark of the best and worst times to post on social media platforms.

Post-Pin-Tweet-Best-Time-OutreachCourtesy of: SurePayroll

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